Iran protests continue as sanctions renew and Iranian officials express fear

Throughout the Iranian regime, concern continues to grow at the continuing protests in light of the economic realities in Iran. The regime is facing a multitude of crises, both on the domestic and international fronts. The biggest issue is the economy, and how it is impacting the life of Iranians. Plus, the economy is about to take another hit as additional U.S. sanctions are coming online. The Trump administration is also after the regime’s oil industry, putting additional sanctions on those who continue to buy Iranian oil after November 4.

Iranians are fed up with the corruption and mismanagement by the regime, and have taken to the streets, calling for freedom and regime change. The Iranian security forces, led by the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), are attempting to repress gathering and break up protests. Those who are identified as leading the protests and demonstrations.

Officials fear protests growing in strength

Fears that the protests have grown in size and frequency are plaguing Iranian officials.

“In comparison to December, the protests have become better organized,” said Abbas Abdi, a key figure in the reformist camp of the Iranian government.

The protests have occurred in cities and villages throughout Iran, while involving multiple industries. Truck drivers, teachers, oil workers, and others are protesting throughout the bazaars, sports events, and others.

All protests are marked with slogans directed at those in the highest forms of government, including the Supreme Leader, Ali Khamenei. The regime’s response is harsh, including physical violence and arrests, in an attempt to stop these protests and discourage others from joining them.

The regime fears its overthrow, which is becoming one of the demands of the protests. Several regime officials have warned against the population’s dissatisfaction with its government and that the protests could spin out of the regime’s control.

Addressing the population’s rage should be the regime’s top priority, said Ali Khoram, a former Iranian diplomat, who also encouraged talks with the international community to address several issues.

Infighting is a part of the regime’s reality now, as fingers are pointed at others for the problems being faced by the Iranian government. No one is proposing any real solutions.

About Siavosh Hosseini (271 Articles)
My background is in the visual arts, particularly in photojournalism. I have had the opportunity to cover scores of international artistic and news events in the US and across Europe since the mid-1980s. I was active in television newsrooms and production as a graphic designer and producer for more than 12 years in different television and news outfits in Europe.
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